Hereward Longley is a doctoral candidate in environmental history at the University of Alberta. Hereward’s research assesses the political and economic development of the oil sands industry against the social and economic impacts of development on nature and Indigenous peoples. Using theoretical insights and methods from environmental history, political ecology, and Indigenous history, Hereward is examining how landscapes and Indigenous communities have been changed by bitumen extraction since 1970, and how late 20th century social and environmental change has influenced resource extraction conflicts between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, government, and extractive industry in the Athabasca region. Hereward holds a SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship.

 

Hereward Longley is a doctoral candidate in environmental history at the University of Alberta. Hereward’s research assesses the political and economic development of the oil sands industry against the social and economic impacts of development on nature and Indigenous peoples. Using theoretical insights and methods from environmental history, political ecology, and Indigenous history, Hereward is examining how landscapes and Indigenous communities have been changed by bitumen extraction since 1970, and how late 20th century social and environmental change has influenced resource extraction conflicts between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, government, and extractive industry in the Athabasca region. Hereward holds a SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship.